Jacques Attali, interviewed by Michel Salomon in L’Avenir de la vie (Seghers, 1981), 264-279

Book discussed: Jacques Attali, L’ordre cannibale : Vie et mort de la médecine (Grasset, 1979, 1996)

Introduction

In this time of upheaval in which medical science is at the eye of the storm, it can be instructive to look back at futurists of the past to see what we missed in their warnings about the brave new world that is upon us. A few weeks ago, I read a Telegram channel that posted a few short quotations from a 1981 interview with Jacques Attali. I tried to find the original source to confirm their authenticity, but it was out of print and not digitized in any format. Amazon France listed the out-of-print book (L’Avenir de la vie) even though no copies were available. It turned out that the interview had generated a great controversy at the time it appeared, and one commenter had posted images of the relevant fifteen pages from the book. The French public had mistaken Attali’s description for prescription, and he subsequently won defamation lawsuits against people who had misrepresented his views.

I obtained the images posted on Amazon France and set about slowly transcribing and translating the interview. For whatever it is worth, readers can now access the interview below, in French and English, and ascertain for themselves whether it helps them perceive the future that was perceived by Jacques Attali forty years ago.

Highlights (2,000 words)

The productivity of machine production is growing faster than the relative productivity of consumer production. This contradiction will be overcome by a transformation of the health and education systems towards their commodification and industrialization…

… the doctor is largely replaced by prostheses whose role is to restore a function of the body, or to replace it…

Throughout the nineteenth century, with the new surveillance, which was hygiene, the new solution, the new separation, was done by the doctor-surgeon, and we saw the policeman and the priest disappear behind the doctor.

… there is a loss of credibility for the doctor. We have much more confidence in the quantified data than in the doctor…

I believe that the important thing in life will no longer be to work but to be in a position to consume, to be a consumer among other consuming machines…

This theoretical discourse is only useful if it stops the foreseen future from happening. We will only avoid being cannibals by ceasing to become so. I believe that the main thing for a theory to be false is not that it is refutable but that it is refuted. The truth is not the refutable, but the refuted…

… there is a choice between three attitudes: either to maintain, or to maintain medical practice as it has been, or to accept change and make it the best possible, with greater equality of access to prostheses, or a third change in which the reference to evil is thought of in a new way, which is neither that of the present or the past. It would be an attitude close to the acceptance of death, so as to make people more aware that the important thing is neither to forget, nor to delay, nor to wait for death, but on the contrary to want life to be as free as possible. Thus, I think that little by little, we will be polarized around these three types of solutions, and I want to show that, in my opinion, the last one is truly humane…

Utopia can have two different characteristics depending on whether we speak of utopia as an absolute dream, thus the dream of eternity, or whether we refer to the etymology of the word. In this sense it means to pursue what has never taken place, and we then try to see what kind of utopia is possible…

I find this fascination with anxiety medications frightening—the search for anything that can eliminate anxiety—but it is the pursuit of a commodity rather than a way of life. We are trying to provide ways to make anxiety tolerable with no effort to create a society without anxiety…

Second, all the medicines of the future that are related to behavior control can have a major political impact. It would indeed be possible to reconcile parliamentary democracy with totalitarianism since it would suffice to maintain all the formal rules of parliamentary democracy but at the same time to generalize the use of these products so that totalitarianism is a part of everyday life…

I think we must distinguish very clearly two kinds of men of the twenty-first century; that is to say the man of the twenty-first century of the rich countries and the man of the twenty-first century of the poor countries. The first will certainly be a man much more anxious than today but who will find his answer to the evil of living in a passive avoidance, in the anti-pain and anti-anxiety machines, in the drugs, and who will try at all costs to live a kind of commercialized form of conviviality…

But besides that, I am convinced that the vast majority, who will be aware of these machines and the way of life of the rich but who will not have access to them, will be extraordinarily aggressive and violent. It is from this distortion that great chaos can result either in racial wars, conquests, or in immigration. Millions of people will want to share our way of life…

I believe that genetic engineering will become in the next twenty years as banal a technique, as well known and also present in everyday life, as the internal combustion engine is today…

With the internal combustion engine we could have made two choices: either favor public transport and make people’s lives easier, or produce automobiles, tools of aggression, consumption, individualization, loneliness, hoarding, desire, rivalry… We chose the second way. I believe that with genetic engineering we have the same type of choice and I believe that we will also, alas, choose the second solution. In other words, with genetic engineering we could gradually create the conditions for humanity living freely, but collectively, or we could create the conditions for a new commodity, genetic this time, which would amount to copies of men sold to men, chimeras or hybrids used as slaves, robots, means of work…

… in the very logic of the industrial system in which we find ourselves, the extension of longevity is no longer an objective desired by the logic of power. Why? Because as long as it was a question of extending life expectancy in order to reach the maximum break-even point of the human machine, in terms of work, it was perfect. But as soon as we live past 60 or 65 years, man lives longer than he produces, and he then costs society dearly. Hence, I believe that in the very logic of industrial society, the objective will no longer be to extend life expectancy, but to ensure that within a fixed lifespan, people live as well as possible but in such a way that health expenditure will be as low as possible in terms of costs for the community. Then a new criterion of life expectancy will appear; that of the value of a health system, a function not of the increase in life expectancy but of the number of years without disease and particularly without hospitalization. Indeed, from the point of view of society, it is much better for the human machine to stop abruptly rather than gradually deteriorate.

health expenditure would not reach a third of the current level (175 billion francs in 1979) if all deaths occurred suddenly in car accidents…

… increasing the lifespan remains a fantasy that corresponds to two objectives: the first is that of people in power. The increasingly totalitarian and top-down societies in which we find ourselves tend to be run by “old” men. They have become gerontocracies. The second reason lies in the possibility for capitalist society to make old age economically profitable simply by making the old solvent. It is currently a “market”, but it is not solvent…

This is entirely in line with the view that man, today, is no longer important as a worker but as a consumer (because he is replaced by machines in work). Therefore, we could accept the idea of increasing life expectancy provided that we make the old solvent and thus create a market. We can see very well how today’s big pharmaceutical companies behave, in relatively egalitarian countries, where at least the way in which retirement is financed is correct: they favor geriatrics, to the detriment of other areas of research such as tropical diseases…

For my part, as a socialist, I am objectively against increasing longevity because it is a distraction, a false problem. I believe that focusing on this type of problem avoids more essential questions such as that of the liberation of the time actually lived in the present life. What is the point of living to a hundred years, if we gain 20 more years of life in a dictatorship? …

Euthanasia will be one of the essential instruments of our future societies in all cases. In a socialist logic, to begin with, the problem arises as follows: the socialist logic is freedom, and a fundamental freedom is the freedom to choose suicide. Consequently, the right to direct or indirect suicide is therefore an absolute value in this type of society. In a capitalist society, killing machines, prostheses which will make it possible to eliminate life when it is too unbearable, or economically too expensive, will emerge and will be put into common practice. I therefore think that euthanasia, whether it is a value of freedom or a commodity, will be one of the features of future society…

The worst drug is the absence of culture. Individuals want drugs because they have no culture. Why do they seek alienation through drugs? Because they have become aware of their powerlessness to live, and this powerlessness translates concretely into the total rejection of life…

An optimistic bet on man would be to say that if man had culture, in the sense of the tools of thought, he could avoid false and impotent solutions. So to take evil at its root is to give men a formidable instrument of subversion and creativity…

I do not believe that the prohibition of drugs would be enough because if you do not attack a problem at its root, you inevitably fall into the trap of policing the problem, and that is worse…

It seems to me that, in the second step, and for economic reasons, a certain number of electronic means will be put in place, which will be either methods of pain control (biofeedback, etc.) or a computer system of psychoanalytic dialogue…

This evolution will have the consequence of leading to what I call the explanation of normal; that is, electronic means will make it possible to precisely define what is normal and quantify social behavior. The latter will become economically consumable since there will be the means and criteria for compliance with standards. In the long run, when disease is defeated, we are tempted to conform, to choose the “biological normal” that conditions the functioning of an absolute social organization…

Medical care is indicative of a society that is now moving towards a centralized totalitarianism. There is already a certain conscious or unconscious desire to conform as much as possible to social norms…

Following the logic of my general reasoning, we do not see why procreation would not become a commodity like any other. One can perfectly imagine that the family or the woman are only one of the means of production of a particular object, the child…

If, for economic reasons, a family does not wish to have more than two children, this attitude is clearly contrary to the interests of the family and of society. The only way to resolve this contradiction is to imagine that society could buy children from a family that would be paid in return. I am not thinking of family allowances, which are weak incentives. A family would agree to have many children if the State guaranteed them substantial progressive allowances on the one hand and full care for the material life of each child on the other. In this scheme, the child will become a kind of currency of exchange in the relations between the individual and the community…

What I am saying here is not on my part a kind of complacency in the face of what seems inevitable. This is a warning. I believe that this world that is forming will be so awful that it signifies the death of mankind. So we have to be prepared to resist it, and it seems to me today that the best way to avoid the worst is to understand this and to accept the fight…

Democracy has a duty to adapt to technical developments. Old constitutions confronted with new technologies can lead to totalitarian systems…

The appearance on the market of individualized items of self-monitoring and self-control will create the preventive spirit. People will adapt in such a way as to conform to the criteria of normality. Prevention will no longer be coercive because it will  be desired by people. But we should not lose sight of the fact that the most important thing is not technological progress but the highest form of exchange between people that culture represents. The form of society that unfolds depends on the ability to master technical progress. Will we dominate it, or will we be dominated by it? That is the question.

FULL INTERVIEW (5,600 words)

(Texte français après l’anglais)

Jacques Attali, interviewed by Michel Salomon in L’Avenir de la vie (Seghers, 1981), 264-279

Book discussed: Jacques Attali, L’ordre cannibale : Vie et mort de la médecine (Grasset, 1979, 1996)

Ein Wunderkind” as the Germans would say, a child prodigy. At less than forty years old [in 1981], Jacques Attali is an economist of international reputation, a teacher, a highly respected political advisor to the Socialist Party and a versatile writer, author not only of theoretical works in his discipline, but of remarkable essays in fields as varied as politics, music and, recently, medicine. The book he published in the autumn of 1979, The Cannibal Order or the Power and Decline of Medicine, revived the debate in France, not only on the validity of medical care but on all existential problems, from birth to death, which underlies the organization of the health care system in the West.

What makes Attali tick?

For those who are his friends, so much energy deployed in so many directions is baffling. For those who are his enemies—and he has many, less because of his kind, endearing personality, than because of his political choices—this gifted man is suspect. Rooted in a terrain of reason, of moderation, of “happy medium”, – the middle of what exactly? – the French establishment has always been wary of intellectuals who trample its gardens “à la française”.

Jacques Attali undoubtedly disturbs, with his excesses, his outrageousness, his permanent and feverish questioning. But in these times of crisis, don’t we need to be more “worried” than reassured?

MICHEL SALOMON (MS): Why is an economist so passionately interested in medicine, and in health?

JACQUES ATTALI (JA): I have seen in studying the general economic problems of Western society, and health costs are one of the essential factors of the economic crisis. The production and maintenance of consumers is expensive, even more expensive than the production of goods themselves. People are produced by services that they render to each other, especially in the field of health, whose economic productivity does not increase very quickly. The productivity of machine production is growing faster than the relative productivity of consumer production. This contradiction will be overcome by a transformation of the health and education systems towards their commodification and industrialization. Anyone who analyzes economic history realizes that our society is increasingly transforming industrial activities and that an increasing number of services rendered by people to people are becoming more and more objects that are produced in machines.

Addressing these two questions leads us to ask if health care can also be produced by machines that would replace the activity of the doctor?

MS: This question seems a bit academic, theoretical…

JA: Certainly, it may reflect the current crisis. If health care, like education, were to be mass-produced, the economic crisis would be quickly resolved. This is a bit like the point of view of the astronomer who would say, “If my reasoning is good, there should be a star there.” If this reasoning is correct, and if our society is coherent, logic leads to this: as other functions were eaten, in the earlier phases of the crisis, by the industrial apparatus, health care becomes a mass-produced activity, which leads to the metaphor.

The latter means that the doctor is largely replaced by prostheses whose role is to restore a function of the body, or to replace it. If the prosthesis tries to do the same thing as the body, it functions as the organs of the body do, and therefore it becomes a copy of organs of the body or functions of the body. Such objects would therefore be prostheses to be consumed. In economic language the problem is clear: it is that of cannibalism. We consume the body.

So from the metaphor (and I always thought it was the source of knowledge) I asked myself two questions:

Is cannibalism close to being therapeutic?

Is there something invariant in the different social structures which would make an axiomatized cannibalism, emanating from the way it was lived, and reduced to operators, in the mathematical sense, that would be found in the therapeutic approach?

Firstly, cannibalism seems to be broadly explained as a therapeutic and foundational strategy. Secondly, it seems that all healing strategies in relation to disease contain a series of operations done by the body itself but also done by cannibalism and that we find in all these strategies: selecting signs that we will observe, monitoring it to see if they are doing well or not, denouncing what will break the order of these signs, what is called Evil: negotiating with Evil, and separating Evil. All healing systems have thus employed these same operations: selection of signs, denunciation of evil, surveillance, negotiation, separation. These different operations are also part of a political strategy: select signs to observe, observe them to see if everything is going well, denounce evil, the scapegoat, the enemy, and keep it away. There is a very deep relationship between the strategy towards individual evil, and the strategy towards social evil. The various fundamental operations applied to different historical periods, on different conceptions that one could have of disease, evil, power, death, life, and therefore of the one who must fulfill the function of designating evil, of separation… In other words, there are the same operations, the same roles, but it is not the same actors who play the roles. And the plays are not performed at the same time.

MS: By founding a theory from historical or mythical cannibalism… Your essay has upset and shocked not only doctors but also those whom people in power must serve, in short, public opinion.

JA: This essay attempts three things:

First, an attempt to tell an economic story of evil, the history of relationships to disease.

Secondly, to show that there are, in a way, four dominant periods and therefore three major crises between which the system shift is structured and that each shift affects not only the healer, but also the very conception of life, death, and disease.

Thirdly, and finally, to show that these shifts concern the signs and not the strategy, which remains that of cannibalism, and that in fact, we start from cannibalism to return to it. In short, we can interpret the whole of industrial history as a machine to translate the original cannibalism, the first relation to evil, where people eat people, into industrial cannibalism, where people become commodities that eat goods. Industrial society functions as a dictionary with different stages in translation: there are intermediate languages, in a way, four major languages. There is the fundamental order, the cannibal order. It is the case that the first gods that appear are cannibals and that in the myths that follow, historically, the cannibal gods eat each other, then it becomes awful for the gods to be cannibals.

In all the myths I have studied, in different civilizations, religion serves in a way to destroy cannibalism. For cannibalism, evil is the souls of the dead. If I want to separate the soul of the dead from the dead, I have to eat the body. For the best way to separate the dead from their souls is to eat the bodies. So what is fundamental in cannibal consumption is separation. This is what I wanted to get at: consumption is separation. Cannibalism is a formidable therapeutic force of power. So why doesn’t cannibalism work anymore? Well, because from the moment (we see it clearly in the myths—and I give an interpretation of both Girard’s work on violence and Freud’s work in Totem and Taboo, in which he sees the totem and the totemic meal as founders, and the totemic meal disappears in sexuality) when I say “eat the dead” this allows me to live, so… I am able to eat. So cannibalism is healing, but it is, at the same time, a producer of violence. And that’s how I try to interpret the transition to sexual prohibitions, always the same as cannibalistic prohibitions. Because it is obvious that if I kill my father, or my mother, or my children, I will prevent the production of the group. And yet they are the ones who are the easiest to kill because they live next to me. Sexual prohibitions are secondary prohibitions compared to food prohibitions. Then, we ritualize. We stage cannibalism in a religious way. In a way, we delegate. We represent. We stage. Religious civilization (268) is a staging of cannibalism. The signs we observe are those of the gods. Disease is possession by the gods. The only diseases that can be observed and cured are those of possession. Healing, finally, is the expulsion of evil, the evil which, in this case, is the Evil One, that is, the gods. And the main healer is the priest. There are always two healers permanently. There is the whistleblower of evil and the separator, who will then be found under the names of doctor and surgeon. The whistleblower of evil is the priest, and the separator is the practitioner.

I try to tell, then, the story on the one hand, that Christian ritualization is fundamentally cannibalistic. Luke’s texts on “bread and wine” which are “the Body and Blood of Christ”, and which if eaten give life, are cannibalistic texts, obviously therapeutic; there is a medical reading, at the same time cannibalistic, of these books, which is striking.

I then try to tell the story of the Church’s relationship to healing, and to see that little by little, probably around the twelfth century or thirteenth century, a new system of signs appeared. We observe not only diseases coming from the gods, but also diseases coming from the bodies of men. Why? Because the economy was beginning to become organized. We were getting out of slavery. The dominant diseases were epidemics that began to circulate like people and goods. The bodies of poor men carried disease and there was a total unity between poverty (which did not exist before because almost everyone was a slave or lord) and disease. Being poor or sick meant the same thing in the thirteenth century. So the strategy towards the poor in politics and that towards the sick were no different. When you were poor, you got sick. When you were sick, you became poor. Disease and poverty did not yet exist. What existed was to be poor and sick, and, the poor or sick being designated, the right strategy was to separate them, to contain them, not to heal them but to destroy them: this was called, in the French texts, to the lock-in—confinement in Foucault’s theses. It occurred in many ways: quarantine, the lazaret [the rear part of a ship’s hold], the hospital and, in England, the workhouses. The laws regarding the poor and charity were not means of helping people but of signifying them as such and containing them. Charity was nothing but a form of denunciation.

MS: The policeman became the therapist instead of the priest.

JA: That’s right. Religion withdrew and took power elsewhere because it could not assume the power of healing any longer. There were, of course, already doctors, but they only gave consolation, and the proof for this is that political power, very curiously, did not yet recognize the diplomas of doctors. Political power considered that its main therapist was the policeman and not the doctors. Moreover, in Europe, at the time, there was only one doctor per 100,000 inhabitants.

In the third period it was no longer possible to lock up the poor because there were too many of them. On the contrary, they had to be held together because they became workers. They ceased to be bodies and became machines. And the signs we see are those of machines. Disease, evil, constituted the breakdown. Clinical language isolated and objectified evil a little more. Evil was designated, separated, and expelled.

Throughout the nineteenth century, with the new surveillance, which was hygiene, the new solution, the new separation, was done by the doctor-surgeon, and we saw the policeman and the priest disappear behind the doctor.

MS: And today, it’s the doctor’s turn to fall into the trap…

JA: Today, the crisis is threefold. On the one hand, as in the previous period, the system can no longer ensure its operation on its own. Today, in a way, medicine is largely unable to cure all diseases because the costs are becoming too high.

On the other hand, there is a loss of credibility for the doctor. We have much more confidence in the quantified data than in the doctor.

Finally, diseases or forms of behavior appear that are no longer treatable by traditional medical practice. These three characteristics lead to a kind of natural continuum that passes from clinical medicine to prosthesis, and I tried to distinguish three phases that interpenetrate in this transformation.

In the first phase, the system tries to last by monitoring its financial costs. But this will lead to the need to monitor behavior and therefore to define norms of health and activities to which the individual must submit. Thus appears the notion of optimum lifestyle for efficiency in health expenditure.

From then on, we move on to the second phase which is that of the self-denunciation of evil thanks to the tools of self-control of behavior. The individual can thus conform to the standard optimum lifestyle and become free of disease.

The main criterion of behavior was, in the first order, to give meaning to death, in the second order, to contain death, in the third order, to increase life expectancy, in the fourth—the one we are experiencing—is the search for a lifestyle that is efficient for health expenditure.

The third phase consists of the appearance of prostheses that make it possible to designate evil in an industrial way. Thus, for example, electronic drugs such as a medication coupled with a microcomputer make it possible to release into the body, at regular intervals, substances that are elements of regulation.

MS: In short, health, with the appearance of these electronic prostheses, will be the new engine of industrial expansion…

JA: Yes, in conclusion, all the traditional concepts disappear—production, consumption. Life and death disappear because the prosthesis blurs the moment of death.

I believe that the important thing in life will no longer be to work but to be in a position to consume, to be a consumer among other consuming machines. The dominant social science so far has been machine science. Marx is a clinician because he points to evil, the capitalist class, and he eliminates it. In a sense, he follows the same discourse as Pasteur. The great dominant social science will be the science of codes, computer science and then genetics. This book [The Cannibal Order or Power and Decline of Medicine] is also a book about codes because I try to show that there are successive codes: the religious code, the police code, the thermodynamic code, and today the informational code and what is called sociobiology.

This theoretical discourse is only useful if it stops the foreseen future from happening. We will only avoid being cannibals by ceasing to become so. I believe that the main thing for a theory to be false is not that it is refutable but that it is refuted. The truth is not the refutable, but the refuted.

MS: Does your thesis lead to a concrete reflection on medicine, even in the long term? Are these the beginnings of a concrete reflection of a politician and economist on the organization of medicine?

JA: I don’t know. For now, I do not want to ask myself that question. I think the first thing I wanted to show, and only this, is that healing is a process in full transformation towards an organizational model that has nothing to do with the current one, and that there is a choice between three attitudes: either to maintain, or to maintain medical practice as it has been, or to accept change and make it the best possible, with greater equality of access to prostheses, or a third change in which the reference to evil is thought of in a new way, which is neither that of the present or the past. It would be an attitude close to the acceptance of death, so as to make people more aware that the important thing is neither to forget, nor to delay, nor to wait for death, but on the contrary to want life to be as free as possible. Thus, I think that little by little, we will be polarized around these three types of solutions, and I want to show that, in my opinion, the last one is truly humane.

MS: It’s social utopia. It’s sometimes dangerous to be utopian…

JA: Utopia can have two different characteristics depending on whether we speak of utopia as an absolute dream, thus the dream of eternity, or whether we refer to the etymology of the word. In this sense it means to pursue what has never taken place, and we then try to see what kind of utopia is possible. But I believe that if we want to understand the problem of health, we must realize that there are plausible utopias. The future is necessarily a utopia, and it is very important to understand that it is not dangerous since to say that utopia means to accept the idea that the future has nothing to do with the prolongation of current trends.

I would even say all futures are possible except one that would be the extension of the current situation.

MS: Is the future this particular prosthesis, all these drugs of the future—and the present—that help man to better cope with his condition?

JA: I find this fascination with anxiety medications frightening—the search for anything that can eliminate anxiety—but it is the pursuit of a commodity rather than a way of life. We are trying to provide ways to make anxiety tolerable with no effort to create a society without anxiety.

Second, all the medicines of the future that are related to behavior control can have a major political impact. It would indeed be possible to reconcile parliamentary democracy with totalitarianism since it would suffice to maintain all the formal rules of parliamentary democracy but at the same time to generalize the use of these products so that totalitarianism is a part of everyday life.

MS: Does this seem conceivable, an Orwellian “1984” based on a pharmacology to control behavior?

JA: I don’t see it as Orwellian because that is a form of technical totalitarianism with a visible and centralized “Big Brother.” Rather, I see implicit totalitarianism with an invisible and decentralized “Big Brother.” These machines to monitor our health, which we might say we have for our own good, will enslave us for our good. In a way, we will undergo a gentle and permanent conditioning.

MS: How do you see the man of the twenty-first century?

JA: I think we must distinguish very clearly two kinds of men of the twenty-first century; that is to say the man of the twenty-first century of the rich countries and the man of the twenty-first century of the poor countries. The first will certainly be a man much more anxious than today but who will find his answer to the evil of living in a passive avoidance, in the anti-pain and anti-anxiety machines, in the drugs, and who will try at all costs to live a kind of commercialized form of conviviality.

But besides that, I am convinced that the vast majority, who will be aware of these machines and the way of life of the rich but who will not have access to them, will be extraordinarily aggressive and violent. It is from this distortion that great chaos can result either in racial wars, conquests, or in immigration. Millions of people will want to share our way of life.

MS: Do you believe that genetic engineering is one of the keys to our future?

JA: I believe that genetic engineering will become in the next twenty years as banal a technique, as well known and also present in everyday life, as the internal combustion engine is today. The same type of parallel can be drawn.

With the internal combustion engine we could have made two choices: either favor public transport and make people’s lives easier, or produce automobiles, tools of aggression, consumption, individualization, loneliness, hoarding, desire, rivalry… We chose the second way. I believe that with genetic engineering we have the same type of choice and I believe that we will also, alas, choose the second solution. In other words, with genetic engineering we could gradually create the conditions for humanity living freely, but collectively, or we could create the conditions for a new commodity, genetic this time, which would amount to copies of men sold to men, chimeras or hybrids used as slaves, robots, means of work.

MS: Is it possible and desirable to live 120 years?

JA: Medically, I don’t know. I was always told that it was possible. Is this desirable? I will answer in several stages. First of all, I believe that in the very logic of the industrial system in which we find ourselves, the extension of longevity is no longer an objective desired by the logic of power. Why? Because as long as it was a question of extending life expectancy in order to reach the maximum break-even point of the human machine, in terms of work, it was perfect. But as soon as we live past 60 or 65 years, man lives longer than he produces, and he then costs society dearly. Hence, I believe that in the very logic of industrial society, the objective will no longer be to extend life expectancy, but to ensure that within a fixed lifespan, people live as well as possible but in such a way that health expenditure will be as low as possible in terms of costs for the community. Then a new criterion of life expectancy will appear; that of the value of a health system, a function not of the increase in life expectancy but of the number of years without disease and particularly without hospitalization. Indeed, from the point of view of society, it is much better for the human machine to stop abruptly rather than gradually deteriorate.

This is perfectly clear if we remember that two-thirds of health spending is concentrated on the last months of life. Similarly, cynicism aside, health expenditure would not reach a third of the current level (175 billion francs in 1979) if all deaths occurred suddenly in car accidents. Thus it must be recognized that the logic no longer lies in the increase in life expectancy but in that of the duration of life without disease. I think, however, that increasing the lifespan remains a fantasy that corresponds to two objectives: the first is that of people in power. The increasingly totalitarian and top-down societies in which we find ourselves tend to be run by “old” men. They have become gerontocracies. The second reason lies in the possibility for capitalist society to make old age economically profitable simply by making the old solvent. It is currently a “market”, but it is not solvent.

This is entirely in line with the view that man, today, is no longer important as a worker but as a consumer (because he is replaced by machines in work). Therefore, we could accept the idea of increasing life expectancy provided that we make the old solvent and thus create a market. We can see very well how today’s big pharmaceutical companies behave, in relatively egalitarian countries, where at least the way in which retirement is financed is correct: they favor geriatrics, to the detriment of other areas of research such as tropical diseases. It is therefore a problem of retirement technology that determines the acceptability of the lifespan.

For my part, as a socialist, I am objectively against increasing longevity because it is a distraction, a false problem. I believe that focusing on this type of problem avoids more essential questions such as that of the liberation of the time actually lived in the present life. What is the point of living to a hundred years, if we gain 20 more years of life in a dictatorship?

MS: The world to come, “liberal” or “socialist”, will need a “biological” morality, to create an ethic of cloning or euthanasia for example.

JA: Euthanasia will be one of the essential instruments of our future societies in all cases. In a socialist logic, to begin with, the problem arises as follows: the socialist logic is freedom, and a fundamental freedom is the freedom to choose suicide. Consequently, the right to direct or indirect suicide is therefore an absolute value in this type of society. In a capitalist society, killing machines, prostheses which will make it possible to eliminate life when it is too unbearable, or economically too expensive, will emerge and will be put into common practice. I therefore think that euthanasia, whether it is a value of freedom or a commodity, will be one of the features of future society.

MS: Won’t the men of tomorrow be conditioned by psychotropic drugs and subjected to manipulations of the psyche? How can people protect themselves?

JA: The only precautions you can take are related to knowledge. It is essential today to ban a very large number of drugs, to stop the proliferation of drugs, but perhaps the frontier has already been crossed. Isn’t television harmful drug? Hasn’t alcohol always been a harmful drug?

The worst drug is the absence of culture. Individuals want drugs because they have no culture. Why do they seek alienation through drugs? Because they have become aware of their powerlessness to live, and this powerlessness translates concretely into the total rejection of life.

An optimistic bet on man would be to say that if man had culture, in the sense of the tools of thought, he could avoid false and impotent solutions. So to take evil at its root is to give men a formidable instrument of subversion and creativity.

I do not believe that the prohibition of drugs would be enough because if you do not attack a problem at its root, you inevitably fall into the trap of policing the problem, and that is worse.

MS: How are we going to deal with mental illness in the future?

JA: The problem of the evolution of treating mental illness will be addressed in two stages. Initially, there will be even more drugs, psychotropic drugs that correspond to a real progress, over the past 30 years, in mental health care.

It seems to me that, in the second step, and for economic reasons, a certain number of electronic means will be put in place, which will be either methods of pain control (biofeedback, etc.) or a computer system of psychoanalytic dialogue.

This evolution will have the consequence of leading to what I call the explanation of normal; that is, electronic means will make it possible to precisely define what is normal and quantify social behavior. The latter will become economically consumable since there will be the means and criteria for compliance with standards. In the long run, when disease is defeated, we are tempted to conform, to choose the “biological normal” that conditions the functioning of an absolute social organization.

Medical care is indicative of a society that is now moving towards a centralized totalitarianism. There is already a certain conscious or unconscious desire to conform as much as possible to social norms.

MS: Do you see this forced normalization governing all areas of life, including sexuality, since science today allows the almost total dissociation of sexuality and conception?

JA: From an economic point of view, there are two reasons that lead me to think that we will go very far.

The first concerns the fact that the production of people is not yet a market like any other. Following the logic of my general reasoning, we do not see why procreation would not become a commodity like any other. One can perfectly imagine that the family or the woman are only one of the means of production of a particular object, the child.

We can, in a way, imagine a “rental matrix” that is already technically possible. This idea corresponds entirely to an economic evolution in the sense that the woman or the couple will be part of the division of labor and general production. Thus it will be possible to buy children as one buys peanuts or a television set.

A second important reason related to the first could explain this new family order. If, from an economic point of view, the child is a commodity like any other, society also considers it so, but for social reasons. Indeed, the survival of communities depends on a sufficient demographic balance for its survival. If, for economic reasons, a family does not wish to have more than two children, this attitude is clearly contrary to the interests of the family and of society. The only way to resolve this contradiction is to imagine that society could buy children from a family that would be paid in return. I am not thinking of family allowances, which are weak incentives. A family would agree to have many children if the State guaranteed them substantial progressive allowances on the one hand and full care for the material life of each child on the other. In this scheme, the child will become a kind of currency of exchange in the relations between the individual and the community.

What I am saying here is not on my part a kind of complacency in the face of what seems inevitable. This is a warning. I believe that this world that is forming will be so awful that it signifies the death of mankind. So we have to be prepared to resist it, and it seems to me today that the best way to avoid the worst is to understand this and to accept the fight. That’s why I pursue my reasoning to its end…

MS: Resist what, since you tell us about an inevitable universe of prostheses?

JA: The prostheses I see coming are not mechanical but are means of fighting against chronic conditions related to the phenomenon of tissue degeneration. Cell engineering, genetic engineering and cloning are paving the way for these prostheses which will be regenerated organs replacing failing organs.

MS: The increasing penetration of technology in society calls for an ethical reflection. Is there not an underlying threat to human freedom?

JA: It is clear that the discourse on prevention, the economics of health, good medical practice, will lead to the need for each individual to have a medical record that will be put in digital storage. For epidemiological reasons, all these files will be centralized in a computer to which doctors will have access. The question arises: will the police be able to have access to these files? I note frankly that Sweden today has this kind of sophisticated system, and Sweden is not known as a dictatorship. Faced with new threats, let us know how to create a new rampart with new procedures. Democracy has a duty to adapt to technical developments. Old constitutions confronted with new technologies can lead to totalitarian systems.

MS: One of the most common projections about the future predicts that humans will be able to exert biological control over their own bodies, among other things, thanks to microprocessors.

JA: This control already exists for the heart through the pacemakers, and also for the pancreas. It should extend to other areas such as pain. There are plans to develop small implants in the body capable of releasing hormones and active substances into target organs. If the aim is to prolong life, this progress is inevitable.

MS: It seems that we are leaving the era of physics and entering the era of biology, close to a panbiology. Is that your opinion?

JA: I think we’re moving out of an energy-controlled universe into the information universe. If matter is energy, life is information. This is why the major producer of tomorrow’s society will be living matter. Thanks in particular to genetic engineering, it will produce new therapeutic weapons, food, and energy.

MS: What is the future of medical practice and medical power?

JA: In a rather brutal way, I would say that just as the washerwomen have faded behind the advertising images of washing machines, the doctors integrated into the industrial system will become the background foils of biological prosthesis. The doctor we know will disappear to make way for a new social category living in the prosthesis industry. As with washing machines, there will be the creators, the sellers, the installers, the repairers of prostheses. My words may be surprising, but the main companies thinking about prostheses are the big car companies such as Régie Renault, General Motors and Ford.

MS: In other words, we will no longer need medical therapists because the “normalization” will be done by a kind of preventive medicine, self-managed or not, and in any case “controlled”. Won’t it necessarily be coercive?

JA: The appearance on the market of individualized items of self-monitoring and self-control will create the preventive spirit. People will adapt in such a way as to conform to the criteria of normality. Prevention will no longer be coercive because it will  be desired by people. But we should not lose sight of the fact that the most important thing is not technological progress but the highest form of exchange between people that culture represents. The form of society that unfolds depends on the ability to master technical progress. Will we dominate it, or will we be dominated by it? That is the question.

END

Michel Salomon, L’Avenir de la vie (Seghers, 1981), 264-279

Livre discuté :

Jacques Attali, L’ordre cannibale : Vie et mort de la médecine (Grasset, 1979, 1996)

« Ein Wunderkind » diraient les Allemands, un enfant-prodige. A moins de quarante ans, Jacques Attali est tout à la fois un économiste de réputation internationale, un enseignant, un conseiller politique très écouté du parti socialiste et un écrivain versatile, auteur non seulement d’ouvrage théorique sur sa discipline, mais d’essais remarqués dans des domaines aussi variés que la politique, la musique, et, récemment, la médicine. Le livre qu’il a publié à l’automne de 1979, L’Ordre Cannibale ou Pouvoir et Déclin de la Médicine a relancé le débat en France, non seulement sur la validité de l’acte thérapeutique mais sur tous les problèmes existentiels, de la naissance à la mort, qui sous-tendent l’organisation du système de soins en Occident.

Qu’est-ce qui fait courir Attali ?

Pour ceux qui sont ces amis, tant d’énergie déployée dans autant de directions à la fois les déconcerte. Pour ceux qui sont ces ennemis—et il en a beaucoup, moins du fait de sa personnalité aimable, attachante, que de ces options politique—ce surdoué est suspect. Enraciné dans un terroir de raison, de mesure, de « juste milieu », —le milieu de quoi au juste ? —l’establishment hexagonale s’est toujours méfié des intellectuels qui piétinent ses jardins « à la française » …

Jacques Attali perturbe sans doute, avec ses excès, ses outrances, son questionnement permanent et fiévreux. Mais en ces temps de crise, n’avons-nous pas besoin d’être plus « inquiétés » que rassurés ? 

MICHEL SALOMON (MS) : Pourquoi un économiste s’intéresse-t-il avec tant de passion a la médicine, a la santé ?

JACQUES ATTALI (JA) : J’ai constaté en étudiant les problèmes économiques généraux de la société occidentale que les couts de la santé sont un des facteurs essentiels de la crise économique. La production de consommateur et leur entretien coûtent cher, plus cher encore que la production de marchandises elles-mêmes. Les hommes sont produits par des services qu’ils se rendent les uns aux autres, en particulier dans le domaine de la santé, dont la productivité économique n’augmente pas très vite. « La productivité de la production de machines » augmente plus rapidement que la productivité relative de la production de consommateurs. Cette contradiction sera levée par une transformation du système de santé et d’éducation vers leur marchandisation et leur industrialisation. Quiconque analyse l’histoire économique se rend compte que notre société transforme de plus en plus des activités industrielles et qu’un nombre croissant de services rendus par des hommes à d’autres deviennent de plus en plus des objets qui sont produits dans des machines.

La rencontre de ces deux questions conduit à se demander : est-ce que la médicine peut, elle aussi, être produite par des machines qui viendraient remplacer l’activité du médecin ?

MS : Cette question parait un peu académique, théorique…

JA : Certes, mais elle rend compte de la crise actuelle. Si la médicine devait, come l’éducation, être produite en série, la crise économique serait vite résolue. C’est un peu le point de vue de l’astronome qui dirait : « Si mes raisonnement son bons, il y a là une étoile… » Si ce raisonnement est exact et si notre société est cohérente, la logique conduit a ceci : comme d’autres fonctions ont été mangées, dans les phases antérieures de la crise, par l’appareil industriel, la médicine devient une activité produite en série, ce qui amène à la métaphore.

Cette dernière signifie que le médecin est largement remplacé par des prothèses qui ont pour rôle de récupérer la fonction du corps, de la rétablir ou de s’y substituer. Si la prothèse tente de faire la même chose, elle le fait comme le font les organes du corps et elle devient donc une copie d’organes du corps ou de fonctions du corps. De tels objets seraient donc des prothèses à consommer. Dans le langage économique la métaphore est claire : c’est celle du cannibalisme. On consomme du corps.

Donc à partir de la métaphore (et j’ai toujours pensé qu’elle était source du savoir) je me suis posé deux questions :

Est-ce que le cannibalisme est proche d’une thérapeutique ?

Est-ce qu’il existe une sorte d’invariant dans les différentes structures sociales, qui ferait qu’un cannibalisme axiomatisé, dégage de la façon dont il était vécu, et ramené à des opérateurs, au sens mathématique, se retrouverait dans la démarche thérapeutique.

Premièrement, le cannibalisme semble pouvoir être expliqué assez largement comme stratégie thérapeutique, fondatrice. Deuxièmement, il semble que toutes les stratégies de guérison en rapport à la maladie contiennent une série d’opérations faites par le corps lui-même mais faites aussi par le cannibalisme et que l’on retrouve dans toutes ces stratégies : sélectionner des signes qu’on va observer, le surveiller pour voir s’ils vont bien ou pas, dénoncer ce qui va rompre l’ordre de ces signes, ce que l’on appelle le Mal : négocier avec le Mal, séparer le Mal. Tous les systèmes de guérison ont ainsi employé ces mêmes opérations : sélection des signes, dénonciation du mal, surveillance, négociation, séparation. Ces différentes opérations relèvent aussi d’une stratégie du politique : sélectionner des signes à observer, les observer pour voir si tout va bien, dénoncer le mal, le bouc émissaire, l’ennemi, et l’éloigner. Il y a des rapports très profonds entre la stratégie à l’égard du Mal individuel, et la stratégie à l’égard du Mal social. Ces diverses opérations fondamentales s’appliquaient à des périodes historiques différentes, sur des conceptions différentes qu’on pouvait avoir de la maladie, du mal, du pouvoir, de la mort, de la vie, et donc de celui qui doit remplir la fonction de désignation du mal, de séparation. Autrement dit, il y a les mêmes opérations, les mêmes rôles, mais ce ne sont pas les mêmes acteurs qui jouent les rôles. Et la pièce ne se joue pas dans le même temps.

MS : De là à fonder une théorie à partir du cannibalisme historique ou mythique… Votre essai a bouleversé et choqué no seulement les médecins mais aussi ces malades que nous sommes tous en puissance, bref l’opinion publique…

JA : Cet essai est une triple tentative :

Premièrement, une tentative de raconter une histoire économique du Mal, l’histoire des rapports à la maladie.

Deuxièmement, de montrer qu’il y a, en quelque sorte, quatre périodes dominantes et donc trois grandes crises entre lesquelles se structurent les basculements de système et que chaque basculement ne touche pas seulement le guérisseur, mais aussi la conception même de la vie, de la mort, de la maladie.

Troisièmement, enfin, de montrer que ces basculements concernent les signes et non pas la stratégie, qui reste celle du cannibalisme, et qu’en fait, on part du cannibalisme pour y revenir. En somme, on peut interpréter toute l’histoire industrielle comme une machine à traduire le cannibalisme fondateur, premier rapport au mal, où les hommes mangent des hommes, en cannibalisme industriel, où les hommes deviennent des marchandises qui mangent des marchandises. La société industrielle fonctionnerait comme un dictionnaire avec différentes étapes dans la traduction : il y a des langues intermédiaires, en quelque sorte, quatre grandes langues. Il y a l’ordre fondamental, l’ordre cannibale. C’est là que les premiers dieux qui apparaissent sont cannibales et que dans les mythes qui suivent, historiquement, les dieux cannibales se mangent entre eux, puis il devient affreux pour les dieux d’être cannibales.

Dans tous les mythes que j’ai étudiés, dan différentes civilisations la religion sert en quelque sorte à détruire le cannibalisme. Pour le cannibalisme, le mal, ce sont les âmes des morts. Si je veux séparer l’âme des morts des morts, if faut que je mange le corps. Car la meilleure façon de séparer les morts de leurs âmes, c’est de manger les corps. Donc ce qui est fondamental dans la consommation cannibale c’est qu’elle est séparation. C’est là où je voulais en venir : la consommation est séparation. Le cannibalisme est une formidable force thérapeutique du pouvoir. Alors pourquoi le cannibalisme ne fonctionne-t-il-plus ? Eh bien, parce qu’à partir du moment (on le voit bien dans les mythes—et je donne là une interprétation tant du travail de Girard sur la violence que de Freud sur « Totem et tabou », dans lequel il voit le totem et le repas totémique comme fondateurs, et le repas totémique disparaitre dans la sexualité) où je dis « manger les morts » me permet de vivre, alors… je vais en trouver à manger. Donc le cannibalisme et guérisseur, mais il est, en même temps, producteur de violence. Et c’est comme cela que j’essaie d’interpréter le passage aux interdits sexuels, toujours les mêmes que les interdits cannibales. Parce qu’il est évident que si je tue mon père, ou ma mère, ou mes enfants, je vais empêcher la production du groupe. Et pourtant ce sont ceux qui sont les plus faciles à tuer étant donné qu’ils vivent à côté de moi. Les interdits sexuels sont des interdits seconds par rapport aux interdits de nourriture. Ensuite, on ritualise, on met en scène le cannibalisme de façon religieuse. En quelque sorte on délègue, on représente, on met en scène. La civilisation religieuse est une mise en scène du cannibalisme. Les signes qu’on observe sont ceux des dieux. La maladie c’est la possession par les dieux. Les seules maladies qu’on peut observer et guérir sont celles de possession. La guérison, enfin, c’est l’expulsion du mal, le mal qui, dans ce cas-là, est le Malin, c’est-à-dire les dieux. Et le guérisseur principal, c’est le prêtre. Il y a toujours deux guérisseurs en permanence. Il y a le dénonciateur du mal et le séparateur, qu’on retrouvera ensuite sous les noms de médecin et chirurgien. Le dénonciateur du mal, c’est le prêtre, et le séparateur c’est le praticien.

J’essaie de raconter, ensuite, l’histoire d’une part, que la ritualisation chrétienne est fondamentalement cannibale. Lex textes de Luc sur « le pain et le vin » qui sont « le Corps et le Sang du Christ », et qui si on les mange donnent la vie, sont des textes cannibales, thérapeutique de toute évidence ; il y a une lecture médicale, en même temps cannibale, de ces livres, qui est frappante.

J’essaie de raconter, ensuite, l’histoire du rapport de l’Église a la guérison, et de voir peu à peu, sans doute autour du XIIème siècle ou XIIIème siècle, qu’un nouveau système de signes apparait. On observe non plus seulement les maladies venant des dieux, mais également les maladies venant du corps des hommes. Pourquoi ? Parce que l’économie commence à devenir organisé. On sort de l’esclavage. Les maladies dominantes sont les épidémies qui commencent à circuler comme les hommes et les marchandises. Les corps des hommes pauvres portent la maladie et il y a une unité totale entre la pauvreté (qui n’existait pas avant parce que presque tout le monde était esclave ou seigneur) et la maladie. Être pauvre ou malade signifiait la même chose du XIIIème siècle. Donc la stratégie à l’égard du pauvre en politique et celle à l’égard du malade ne sont pas différentes. Quand on est pauvre, on tombe malade. Quand on est malade, on devient pauvre. La maladie et la pauvreté n’existe pas encore. Ce qui existe c’est être pauvre et malade, et, le pauvre ou malade étant désigné, la bonne stratégie consiste à le séparer, à le contenir, non à le guérir mais à le détruire : on a appelé cela, dans les textes français, à l’enfermer—enfermement dans les thèses de Foucault. On l’enferme de multiples façons : la quarantaine, le lazaret, l’hôpital et en Angleterre les work-houses. La loi sur les pauvres et la charité ne sont pas des moyens d’aider les personnes mais de les désigner comme telles et de les contenir. La charité n’est autre qu’une forme de dénonciation.

MS : Le policier devient le thérapeute à la place du prêtre.

JA : C’est cela. La religion se retire et prend le pouvoir ailleurs car elle ne peut pas assumer plus longtemps le pouvoir de guérison. Il y a, certes, déjà des médecins mais ceux-ci ne jouent qu’un rôle de consolation et, preuve en est, le pouvoir politique, très curieusement, ne reconnait pas encore le diplômes des médecins. Le pouvoir politique considère que son principal thérapeute est le policier et nullement les médecins. D’ailleurs en Europe, à l’époque, il n’y avait qu’un médicine pour 100,000 habitants.

Mais j’en viens à la troisième période où il n’est plus possible d’enfermer les pauvres parce qu’ils sont trop nombreux. Ceux-ci doivent, au contraire, être entretenus parce qu’ils deviennent des travailleurs. Ils cessent d’être des corps pour devenir des machines. Et les signes qu’on observe sont ceux des machines. La maladie, le mal, constituent la panne. Le langage clinique isole, objectivise un peu plus encore le mal. On désigne le mal, on le sépare et on l’expulse.

Pendant tout le XIXème siècle, avec la nouvelle surveillance qui est l’hygiène, la nouvelle réparation, la nouvelle séparation médecin-chirurgien, on voit le policier et le prêtre s’effacer derrière le médecin.

MS : Et aujourd’hui, c’est au tour du médecin de tomber dans la trappe…

JA : Aujourd’hui, la crise est triple. D’une part, comme dans la période antérieure, le système ne peut plus assurer à lui tout seul son fonctionnement. Aujourd’hui, d’une certaine façon, la médecine est largement incapable de soigner toutes les maladies car les couts deviennent trop élevés.

D’autre part, on observe une perte de crédibilité du médecin. On a beaucoup plus confiance dans les données quantifiées que dans le médecin.

Enfin apparaissent des maladies ou des formes de comportement qui ne sont plus redevables de la médecine classique. Ces trois caractéristiques conduisent à une sorte de continuum naturel qui passe de la médecine clinique à la prothèse, et j’ai essayé de distinguer trois phases qui s’interpénètrent dans cette transformation.

Dans une première phase, le système tente de durer en surveillant ses couts financiers. Mais cette volonté débouche sur la nécessité de surveiller les comportements et donc de définir des normes de santé, d’activités, auxquelles l’individu doit se soumettre. Ainsi apparait la notion de profil de vie économe en dépense de santé.

Des lors, on passe à la seconde phase qui est celle de l’autodénonciation du mal grâce aux outils d’autocontrôle du comportement. L’individu peut ainsi se conformer à la norme de profil de vie et devenir autonome par rapport à sa maladie.

Le principal critère du comportement était, dans le premier ordre, donner un sens à la mort, dans le second ordre, contenir la mort, dans le troisième ordre, augmenter l’espérance de vie, dans le quatrième, celui que nous vivons, c’est la recherche d’un profil de vie économe en dépense de santé.

La troisième phase est constituée par l’apparition de prothèses qui permettent de designer le mal de façon industrielle. Ainsi, par exemple, les médicaments électroniques tels que la pilule couplée à un micro-ordinateur permettent de libérer dans le corps, à intervalles réguliers, des substances, éléments de la régulation.

MS : En somme, la santé, avec l’apparition de ces prothèses électroniques, sera le nouveau moteur de l’expansion industrielle…

JA : Oui, en conclusion, tous les concepts traditionnels disparaissent : production, consommation disparaissent, vie et mort disparaissent parce que la prothèse rend la mort un moment flou…

Je crois que l’important de la vie ne sera plus de travailler mais d’être en situation de consommer, d’être un consommateur parmi d’autres machines de consommation. La science sociale dominante jusqu’à présent a été la science des machines. Marx est un clinicien car il désigne le mal, la classe capitaliste, et il l’élimine. Il tient, dans un sens, le même discours que Pasteur. La grande science sociale dominante sera la science des codes, informatique puis génétique. Ce livre [L’Ordre Cannibale ou Pouvoir et Déclin de la Médicine] est d’ailleurs aussi un livre sur les codes parce que j’essaie de montrer qu’il y a des codes successifs : le code religieux, le code policier, le code thermodynamique, et aujourd’hui le code informationnel et ce que l’on appelle la sociobiologie.

Ce discours théorique n’est utile que si l’avenir ne se produit pas : nous n’éviterons d’être cannibales qu’en cessant de le devenir. Je crois que l’essentiel, pour qu’une théorie soit fausse, n’est pas qu’elle soit réfutable mais réfutée. Le vrai n’est pas le réfutable, mais le réfuté.

MS : Votre thèse débouche-t-elle sur une réflexion concrète sur la médecine, même à terme ; est-ce que ce sont les prémices d’une réflexion concrète d’homme politique et d’économiste sur l’organisation de la médecine ?

JA : Je ne sais pas. Pour l’instant, je ne veux pas me poser cette question. Je crois que la première chose que j’ai voulu montrer, uniquement cela, c’est que la guérison est un processus en pleine transformation vers un modèle d’organisation qui n’a rien à voir avec l’actuel, et que le choix est entre trois types d’attitude : ou conserver, ou conserver actuellement la médecine comme naguère, ou accepter l’évolution et faire qu’elle soit la meilleure possible, avec un plus grande égalité de l’accès aux prothèses, soit une troisième évolution dans laquelle le renvoi au mal est pensé d’une nouvelle façon, qui ne soit ni celle du passé, ni celle de l’avenir du system cannibale ; elle serait une attitude proche de l’acceptation de la mort, de façon a rendre les gens plus conscient que l’urgent n’est ni d’oublier, ni de retarder, ni d’attendre la mort, mais au contraire de vouloir que la vie soit la plus libre possible. Ainsi, je pense que, peu à peu, on se polarisera autour de ces trois types de solutions et je veux montrer, qu’à mon sens, la dernière est véritablement humaine.

MS : C’est de l’utopie sociale ; c’est parfois dangereux d’être utopique…

JA : L’utopie peut avoir deux caractéristiques différentes suivant qu’on parle de l’utopie comme d’un rêve absolu alors le rêve est un rêve d’éternité, soit qu’on se réfère à l’étymologie du mot, cet à dire à ce qui n’a jamais pris place et on tente alors de voir quel type d’utopie est vraisemblable. Or je crois que si on veut comprendre le problème de santé, il faut se rendre compte qu’il y a des utopies vraisemblables. L’avenir est nécessairement une utopie, et c’est très important de comprendre qu’elle n’est pas dangereuse puisque parler utopie signifie accepter l’idée que l’avenir n’a rien à voir avec les prolongations de tendances actuelles.

Je dirais même tous les futurs sont possibles sauf un qui serait la prolongation de la situation actuelle.

MS : L’avenir, est-ce que cette prothèse particulière que sont tous ces médicaments du futur—et du présent—qui aident l’homme à mieux supporter sa condition… ?

JA : Je trouve effrayante cette fascination pour les médicaments contre l’angoisse, tout ce qui peut être à même éliminer l’angoisse, mais comme une marchandise et non pas comme un mode de vie. On essaye de donner des moyens de rendre tolérable l’angoisse et non pas de créer les fonctions pour ne plus être angoissé.

Ensuite, toutes les médecines du futur qui sont liées au contrôle du comportement peuvent avoir une incidence politique majeure.

Il serait possible en effet de rendre conciliable la démocratie parlementaire avec le totalitarisme puisqu’il suffirait de maintenir toutes les règles formelles de la démocratie parlementaire mais en même temps de généraliser l’utilisation de ces produits pour que le totalitarisme soit quotidien.

MS : Est-ce que cela parait concevable, un « 1984 » orwellien base sur une pharmacologie du comportement… ?

JA : Je ne crois pas à l’orwellisme, parce que c’est une forme de totalitarisme technique avec un « Big Brother » visible et centralisé. Je crois plutôt à un totalitarisme implicite avec un « Big Brother » invisible et décentralisé. Ces machines pour surveiller notre santé, que nous pourrions avoir pour notre bien, nous asserviront pour notre bien. En quelque sorte nous subirons un conditionnement doux et permanent…

MS : Comment voyez-vous l’homme du XXIème siècle ?

JA : Je crois qu’il faut très nettement distinguer deux sortes d’hommes du XXIème siècle, c’est-à-dire : l’homme du XXIème siècle des pays riches et l’homme du XXIème siècle des pays pauvres. Le premier sera certainement un homme beaucoup plus angoissé qu’aujourd’hui mais qui trouvera sa réponse au mal de vivre dans une fuite passive, dans les machines anti-douleur et anti-angoisse, dans les drogues, et qui tentera à tout prix de vivre une sorte de forme marchande de la convivialité.

Mais à côté de cela, je suis convaincu que l’immense majorité, qui aura connaissance de ces machines et du mode de vie des riches mais qui n’y aura pas accès, sera extraordinairement agressive et violente. C’est de cette distorsion que naitra le grand chaos qui pourra se traduire soit par des guerres raciales, des conquêtes, soit par l’immigration sous nos contrées de millions de personnes qui voudront partager notre mode de vie.

MS : Croyez-vous que le génie génétique soit l’une des clés de notre avenir ?

JA : Je crois que le génie génétique sera dans les vingt années à venir une technique aussi banale, aussi connue et aussi présente dans la vie quotidienne que l’est aujourd’hui le moteur à explosion. C’est d’ailleurs le même type de parallèle qu’on peut établir.

Avec le moteur à explosion on pouvait faire deux choix : soit privilégier les transports en commun et faciliter la vie des gens, soit produire des automobiles, outils d’agressivité, de consommation, d’individualisation, de solitude, de stockage, de désir, de rivalité… On a choisi la deuxième solution. Je crois qu’avec le génie génétique on a le même type de choix et je crois qu’on choisira aussi, hélas, la deuxième solution. En d’autres termes, avec le génie génétique on pourrait peu à peu créer les conditions d’une humanité s’assumant elle-même librement, mais collectivement, ou alors créer les conditions d’une marchandise nouvelle, génétique cette fois-ci, qui serait faite de copies d’hommes vendues aux hommes, de chimères ou d’hybrides utilisés comme des esclaves, des robots, des moyens de travail…

MS : Est-il possible et souhaitable de vivre 120 ans ?

JA : Médicalement, je n’en sais rien. On m’a toujours dit que c’était possible. Est-ce souhaitable ? Je répondrai en plusieurs temps. D’abord je crois que dans la logique même du system industriel dans lequel nous nous trouvons, l’allongement de la durée de la vie n’est plus un objectif souhaité par la logique du pouvoir. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’aussi longtemps qu’il s’agissait d’allonger l’espérance de vie afin d’atteindre le seuil maximum de rentabilité de la machine humaine, en termes de travail, c’était parfait.

Mais dès qu’on dépasse 60/65 ans, l’homme vit plus longtemps qu’il ne produit et il coute alors cher à la société.

D’où je crois que dans la logique même de la société industrielle, l’objectif ne va plus être d’allonger l’espérance de vie, mais de faire en sorte qu’à l’intérieure même d’une durée de vie déterminée, l’homme vive le mieux possible mais de telle sorte que les dépenses de santé seront les plus réduites possible en termes de coûts pour la collectivité. Alors apparait un nouveau critère d’espérance de vie : celui de la valeur d’un système de santé, fonction non pas de l’allongement de l’espérance de vie mais du nombre d’années sans maladie et particulièrement sans hospitalisation. En effet du point de vue de la société, il est bien préférable que la machine humaine s’arrête brutalement plutôt qu’elle ne se détériore progressivement.

C’est parfaitement clair si l’on se rappelle que les deux tiers des dépenses de santé sont concentrés sur les derniers mois de vie. De même, cynisme mis à part, les dépenses de santé n’atteindraient pas le tiers du niveau actuel (175 milliards de francs en 1979) si les individus mouraient tous brutalement dans des accidents de voiture. Ainsi force est de reconnaitre que la logique ne réside plus dans l’augmentation de l’espérance de vie mais dans celle de la durée de vie sans maladie. Je pense cependant que l’augmentation de la durée de vie reste un fantasme qui correspond à deux objectifs : le premier est celui des hommes de pouvoir. Les sociétés de plus en plus totalitaires et directives dans lesquelles nous nous trouvons tendent à être dirigées par des hommes « vieux », à devenir des gérontocraties. La seconde raison réside dans la possibilité pour la société capitaliste de rendre économiquement rentable la vieillesse simplement en rendant solvables les vieux. C’est actuellement un « marché », mais il n’est pas solvable.

Cela va tout à fait dans l’optique selon laquelle l’homme, aujourd’hui, n’est plus important comme travailleur mais comme consommateur (parce qu’il est remplacé par des machines dans le travail). Donc, on pourrait accepter l’idée d’allongement de l’espérance de vie à condition de rendre les vieux solvables et créer ainsi un marché. On voit très bien comment se comportent les grandes entreprises pharmaceutiques actuelles, dans les pays relativement égalitaires ou au moins le mode de financement de la retraite est correct : elles privilégient la gériatrie, au détriment d’autres domaines de recherche comme les maladies tropicales.

C’est donc un problème de technologie de la retraite qui détermine l’acceptabilité de la durée de vie.

Je sui pour ma part, en tant que socialiste, objectivement contre l’allongement de la vie parce que c’est un leurre, un faux problème. Je crois que poser ce type de problème permet d’éviter des questions plus essentielles telle que celle de la libération du temps réellement vécu dans la vie présente. A quoi cela sert de vivre jusqu’à cent ans, si nous gagnons 20 ans de dictature ?

MS : Le monde à venir, « libéral » ou « socialiste », aura besoin d’une morale « biologique », de se créer une éthique du clonage ou de l’euthanasie par exemple.

JA : L’euthanasie sera un des instruments essentiels de nos sociétés futures dans tous les cas de figures. Dans une logique socialiste, pour commencer, le problème se pose comme suit : la logique socialiste c’est la liberté et la liberté fondamentale, c’est le suicide : en conséquence, le droit au suicide direct ou indirect est donc une valeur absolue dans ce type de société. Dans une société capitaliste, des machines à tuer, des prothèses qui permettront d’éliminer la vie lorsqu’elle sera trop insupportable, ou économiquement trop coûteuse, verront le jour et seront de pratique courante. Je pense donc que l’euthanasie, qu’elle soit une valeur de liberté ou une marchandise, sera une des règles de la société future.

MS : Les homme de demain ne seront-ils pas conditionnés par les psychotropes et soumis à des manipulations du psychisme ? Comment s’en prémunir ?

JA : Les seules précautions que l’on puisse prendre sont liées au savoir et à la connaissance. Il est essentiel, aujourd’hui d’interdire un très grand nombre de drogues, d’arrêter la prolifération de drogues du conditionnement ; mais peut-être la frontière est-elle déjà franchie…

Est-ce que, de son côté, la télévision n’est pas une drogue excessive ?

Est-ce que l’alcool n’a pas toujours été une drogue excessive ?

La pire des drogues c’est l’absence de culture. Les individus veulent des drogues parce qu’ils n’ont pas de culture. Pourquoi recherchent-ils l’aliénation par les drogues ? Parce qu’ils ont pris conscience de leur impuissance à vivre et que cette impuissance se traduit concrètement par le refus total de la vie.

Un pari optimiste sur l’homme serait de dire que si l’homme avait la culture, au sens des outils de la pensée, il pourrait échapper aux solutions d’impuissance. Donc, prendre le mal à la racine, c’est donner aux hommes un formidable instrument de subversion et de créativité.

Je ne crois pas que l’interdiction des drogues serait suffisante car si on n’attaque pas un problème à sa racine, on tombe inévitablement dans l’engrenage de la police et c’est pire.

MS : Comment allons-nous, à l’avenir, faire front à la maladie mentale ?

JA : Le problème de l’évolution de la médecine des maladies mentales se fera en deux temps. Dans un premier temps il y aura davantage encore de drogues, les psychotropes qui correspondent à un véritable progrès, depuis 30 ans, de la médecine mentale.

Il me semble que, dans un second temps, et pour des raisons économiques, se mettront en place un certain nombre de moyens électroniques, qui seront soit des méthodes de contrôle de la douleur (biofeedback, etc.), soit un système informatique de dialogues psychanalytiques.

Cette évolution aura pour conséquence de conduire à ce que j’appelle l’explication du normal ; c’est-à-dire que les moyens électroniques permettront de définir avec précision le normal et de quantifier le comportement social. Ce dernier deviendra économiquement consommable puisque existeront les moyens et les critères de conformité aux normes. A long terme, lorsque la maladie sera vaincue, pointe la tentation de conformité au « normal biologique » qui conditionne le fonctionnement d’une organisation sociale absolue.

La médecine est révélatrice d’une société qui s’oriente demain vers un totalitarisme décentralisé. On perçoit déjà un certain désir conscient ou inconscient de se conformer le plus possible à des normes sociales.

MS : Cette normalisation forcée, la voyez-vous régir tous les domaines de la vie, y compris la sexualité, puisque la science permet aujourd’hui la dissociation à peu près totale de la sexualité et de la conception ?

JA : D’un point de vue économique, il y a deux raisons qui me permettent de penser qu’on ira très loin.

La première concerne le fait que la production des hommes n’est pas encore un marché comme les autres. En suivant la logique de mon raisonnement général, on ne voit pas pourquoi la procréation ne deviendrait pas une production économique comme les autres.

On peut parfaitement imaginer que la famille ou la femme ne soient qu’un des moyens de production d’un objet particulier, l’enfant.

On peut, en quelque sorte, imaginer des « matrice de location » qui d’ores et déjà sont techniquement possibles. Cette idée correspond tout à fait à une évolution économique en ce sens que la femme ou le couple s’inscriront dans la division du travail et dans la production générale. Ainsi il sera possible d’acheter des enfants comme on achète des « cacahuètes » ou un poste de télévision.

Une deuxième raison importante et liée à la première pourrait expliquer ce nouvel ordre familial. Si sur le plan économique l’enfant est une marchandise comme les autres, la société le considère également ainsi mais pour des raisons sociales. En effet, la survie des collectivités dépend d’une démographie suffisante pour sa survie. Si pour des raisons économique la famille ne souhaite pas avoir plus de deux enfants, cette attitude s’oppose à l’évidence à l’intérêt de la famille et celui de la société. Le seul moyen de résoudre cette contradiction est d’imaginer que la société puisse acheter des enfants à une famille qui serait payée en retour. Je ne pense pas aux allocations familiales qui sont de faibles incitations. Une famille accepterait d’avoir de nombreux enfants si l’État leur garantissait d’une part le versement d’allocations progressives substantielles et d’autre part la prise en charge totale de la vie matérielle de chaque enfant. Dans ce schéma, l’enfant deviendra une sorte de monnaie d’échange dans les rapports entre l’individu et la collectivité.

Ce que je dis là n’est pas de ma part une sorte de complaisance devant ce qui parait l’inévitable. C’est un avertissement. Je crois que ce monde en préparation sera tellement affreux qu’il signifie la mort de l’homme. If faut donc se préparer à y résister et il me semble aujourd’hui que la meilleure façon de le faire, c’est de comprendre, d’accepter le combat, pour éviter le pire. C’est pour cela que je pousse mon raisonnement au bout…

MS : Résister à quoi, puisque vous nous annoncez un univers inéluctable de prothèses ?

JA : Les prothèses que je vois venir ne sont pas mécaniques mais sont des moyens de lutte contre les affections chroniques liées au phénomène de dégénérescence tissulaire. Le génie cellulaire, le génie génétique et le clonage préparent la voie à ces prothèses qui seront des organes régénérés remplaçant les organes défaillants.

MS : Le pénétration croissante de l’informatique dans la société invite à une réflexion éthique. N’y a-t-il pas là une menace sous-jacente pour la liberté de l’homme ?

JA : Il est clair que les discours sur la prévention, l’économie de la santé, la bonne pratique médicale, amèneront à la nécessité pour chaque individu de posséder un dossier médical qui sera mis sure une bande magnétique. Pour des raisons épidémiologiques, l’ensemble de ces dossiers seront centralisés dans un ordinateur auquel les médecins auront accès. La question se pose : la police pourra-t-elle avoir accès à ces fichiers ? Je constate en toute honnêteté que la Suède possède aujourd’hui ce genre de système sophistiqué et ne connait pas pour autant de dictature. A des menaces nouvelles sachons créer le rempart de procédures nouvelles. La démocratie a le devoir de s’adapter à l’évolution technique. Les vieilles constitutions confrontées aux technologies nouvelles peuvent conduire à des systèmes totalitaires.

MS : Une des projections le plus courantes sur l’avenir prévoit que l’homme pourra exercer un contrôle biologique sur son propre corps, entre autres, grâce aux microprocesseurs…

JA : Ce contrôle existe déjà pour le cœur par le biais des « pacemakers », et également pour le pancréas. Il devrait s’étendre à d’autres domaines comme celui de la douleur. On prévoit la mise au point de petits implants dans l’organisme capable de libérer dans des organes-cibles des hormones et des substances actives. S’il vise à prolonger la vie, ce progrès est inévitable.

MS : Il semble que nous quittons l’ère de la physique pour entrer dans l’ère de la biologie, proche d’une panbiologie. Est-ce votre avis ?

JA : Je crois que nous sortons d’un univers contrôlé par l’énergie pour entrer dans l’univers de l’information. Si la matière est énergie, la vie est information. C’est pourquoi le producteur majeur de la société de demain sera la matière vivante. Grace en particulier au génie génétique, elle sera productrice de nouvelles armes thérapeutiques, d’aliments et d’énergie.

MS : Quel est l’avenir du médicine et du pouvoir médical ?

JA : De manière un peu brutale, je dirais que de même que les lavandières se sont effacées derrière les images publicitaires des machines à laver, les médecins intégrés dans le system industriel deviendront les faire-valoir de la prothèse biologique. Le médecin que nous connaissons disparaitra pour laisser la place à une catégorie sociale nouvelle vivant de l’industrie de la prothèse. Comme pour les machines à laver existeront les créateurs, les vendeurs, les installateurs, les réparateurs de prothèses. Mes propos peuvent surprendre mais sait-on que les principales entreprises qui réfléchissent aux prothèses sont les grandes firmes automobiles telles que la Régie Renault, General Motors et Ford.

MS : En d’autres termes, on n’aura plus besoin de médecins thérapeutes car la « normalisation » sera faite par une sorte de médecine préventive, autogérée ou non, et en tous cas « contrôlée ». Ne sera-t-elle pas forcément coercitive ?

JA : L’apparition sur le marché d’articles individualisés d’autosurveillance et d’autocontrôle créera l’esprit préventif. Les personnes s’adapteront de manière à être conformes aux critères de normalité ; la prévention ne sera plus coercitive car voulue par les personnes. Mais il ne faudrait pas perdre de vue que le plus important n’est pas le progrès technologique mais bien la forme la plus élevée de commerce entre les hommes que représente la culture. La forme de société que nous prépare l’avenir est fonction de la capacité à maitriser le progrès technique. Le dominerons-nous ou serons-nous dominés par lui ? Là est la question.